Sea Cucumber Holothuria scabra; Holothuria fuscogilva

While sea cucumber have been used in Asian cuisines for centuries, their use in Australia is relatively recent.

Following a complicated process of boiling and smoke drying, the dried skin of sea cucumber can be used in soups and in stir-fried dishes. They can also be pickled.

A traditional Chinese preparation (sometimes referred to as “hoy sum”) is to poach the sea cucumber, and cover with a thick sauce of garlic, ginger, onion and soy sauce.

Whole sea cucumber can be stuffed with a filling of pork, cornstarch and chopped, fried dried fish.

In some parts of Asia, internal organs such as gonads and intestines are fermented, pickled or dried to produce very high priced specialty products.

Sea cucumber have naturally high protein levels and, in Asia, are highly valued for their reputed effects as an aphrodisiac.

Taste

Flavour OilinessMoisture
Mild High Dry

Wines

The flavours added to the final preparation of Sea Cucumber will determine the accompanying wine. Generally, try a cool climate Riesling from the Adelaide Hills or Victoria.

Nutrition Information (average quantity per 100g)

Energy 136 kJ Omega 3 0.037 g Magnesium

n/a

Protein 7.99 g Alpha‐linolenic acid n/a
Molybdenum

0.20 mg

Cholesterol n/a
Docosahexaenoic acid n/a
Phosphorus

n/a

Sodium 49.5 mg Eicosapentaenoic acid n/a
Selenium

n/a

Fat (total)

0.2 g

Carbohydrate

0 g

Vitamin A

n/a

Saturated fat 0.531 g
Sugars

0 g

Vitamin E

n/a

Monounsaturated fat 0.045 g
Iodine

0.105 mg

Zinc

n/a

Trans fat

n/a

Calcium

n/a

Polyunsaturated fat 0.101 g
Copper

n/a